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National Letter Writing Day

Happy National Letter Writing Day! It’s time to bring out your loveliest stationary and your favorite pen. It’s time to concentrate fully on communicating to just one special someone. It’s time to think about exactly what you want to say before you say it because, with a pen, there’s no cut and paste function.

For today’s writing prompt, I’d like you to simply write a letter. You can tuck your letter into one of your Christmas cards, hand deliver your letter to someone nearby, or mail it to someone you miss. You can even write a letter to someone from your past you’ll never see again, a person who meant something special to you, or someone you hope to meet in the future–a future spouse, a future child, a future employer.

Letters are wonderful tools to help connect with someone and get you started writing special life you may share with your letter’s recipient. Letters give you an automatic audience. They infuse a sense of warmth and purpose into your writing because it’s directed to someone you know. Letters remove the pressure to write perfectly crafted prose.

Do you write letters regularly, or has email, text messaging, and phone calls made letter writing a virtually foreign experience for you these days? Let me know your thoughts about letter-writing in the comments below and read this article about National Letter Writing Day. Then, head to your desk, light a candle, and pen a letter to someone you love from your past, present, or future.

3 Responses to “National Letter Writing Day”

  1. Judi December 7, 2017 at 1:27 pm #

    I do, in fact, still write letters. Today I have three to write. I could easily call two of these people, but it’s not the same. While I love hearing their voices, letters can be reread and pictures can be added. I know letter writing is all but a lost art, but not with me. Writing a letter is writing a memoir, is it not? I don’t go into the depth I would writing a memoir, but still, I’m sharing things that have happened, to me or others, or in the world. I’m sharing my feelings and reactions. Oh yes, there is not doubt, they are mini-memoirs.

  2. Pam McComb-Podmostko December 8, 2017 at 9:44 am #

    I began writing letters when I was about 10 years old. I LOVED it and I still do it today, 54 years later. I taught in a small Christian school for 12 years and one of the classes I taught was Creative Writing. Twice during the year, usually before Thanksgiving and then before Mother’s Day I brought in stationary, envelopes, stamps and their assignment was to write a letter and I mailed them. Their instructions for the Thanksgiving one was pick an adult in their life that they were thankful for and to write to them and tell them why they were important in their life. Obviously, the one before Mother’s Day they were to write a letter to their Mom. Boy oh Boy, the first couple of years believe me when I say these high school kids did it kicking and screaming; some didn’t even know how to address an envelope…really. BUT once they started getting such positive feedback after their letters arrived, all of a sudden they wanted to know when we would have that assignment again. I had moms calling me in tears because of how much it meant to them to have a letter arrive in their mailbox from either their teenage son or daughter. I will never complain about the cost of postage because sending personal correspondence to me is priceless, both writing and receiving it. I have letters that my ancestors wrote to one another more and 100 years ago. My Great Grandmother was one of 14. Seven of them stayed in Ireland and seven of them came to America in the late 1800’s and the only way they could communicate was through letters. Sadly I guess most of them got thrown away somewhere along the way, but I am fortunate enough to have about six or seven letters handed down to me as well as some Christmas cards. They are worth more than gold to me. As long as I can hold a pen in my hand, I will not stop writing letters.

    • Judi December 8, 2017 at 10:14 am #

      Beautiful! Keep writing.

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